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The Morando Method: How to Focus on What the Customer is Telling You and Close More Deals



If you are a B2B salesperson, you know how challenging it can be to close a deal. You have to deal with multiple stakeholders, complex decision-making processes, and fierce competition. You also have to overcome objections, negotiate terms, and handle rejections. But what if there was a simple way to close more deals, faster and easier? What if you could use one simple question to move your prospects from interest to action, and from action to commitment? That's what the Morando Method is all about. It's a proven sales framework that helps you generate more revenue by focusing on the most important thing: what the customer is telling you. In this article, you will learn: - What is the Morando Method and how it works - Why the Morando Method is different from other sales methodologies - How to apply the Morando Method to your sales process - How to use the one simple question that powers the perfect close - How to overcome common sales challenges with the Morando Method - How to get started with the Morando Method today ## What is the Morando Method and how it works The Morando Method is a sales framework created by Mitch Morando, a serial entrepreneur and sales coach who has helped hundreds of B2B startups grow their revenue. The Morando Method is based on three simple principles: - Focus on what matters: the customer's pain, goals, and needs - Listen more than you talk: ask open-ended questions and listen actively - Ship revenue: move the customer through the sales cycle and close the deal The Morando Method is not a one-size-fits-all approach. It's a flexible and adaptable framework that can be applied to any B2B sales situation, whether you are selling software, hardware, services, or solutions. The Morando Method consists of four steps: 1. Qualify: identify your ideal customer profile and target the right prospects 2. Discover: uncover your customer's pain points, goals, and needs 3. Demo: show your customer how your solution can solve their problems and deliver value 4. Close: ask for the sale and handle any objections or concerns Each step of the Morando Method has a specific purpose and outcome. By following these steps, you can build trust and rapport with your customer, demonstrate your expertise and credibility, and create a sense of urgency and desire for your solution. ## Why the Morando Method is different from other sales methodologies There are many sales methodologies out there, such as SPIN Selling, Challenger Sale, Sandler Selling System, etc. Each one has its own merits and drawbacks, but they all share some common flaws: - They are too complicated and rigid: they require you to memorize scripts, formulas, techniques, and acronyms that may not fit your style or situation - They are too focused on features and benefits: they assume that your customer cares about what your product does, rather than what it can do for them - They are too pushy and aggressive: they pressure you to manipulate or coerce your customer into buying something they may not want or need The Morando Method is different because it is: - Simple and straightforward: it only requires you to remember one simple question that can guide you through any sales conversation - Customer-centric and value-driven: it focuses on understanding your customer's problems and goals, rather than pitching your product features - Collaborative and consultative: it helps you build a partnership with your customer, rather than a transactional relationship The Morando Method is not about selling; it's about helping. It's not about convincing; it's about influencing. It's not about closing; it's about opening. ## How to apply the Morando Method to your sales process The Morando Method can be easily integrated into your existing sales process. You don't have to change everything you do; you just have to tweak some things you say. Here are some tips on how to apply the Morando Method to each step of your sales process: ### Qualify Before you reach out to a prospect, you need to make sure they are a good fit for your solution. You don't want to waste time on leads that are not qualified or interested. To qualify a prospect, you need to answer four questions: - Do they have a problem that your solution can solve? - Do they have a budget that matches your price range? - Do they have the authority to make or influence the buying decision? - Do they have a timeline or urgency to solve their problem? You can use various sources of information to answer these questions, such as: - Your marketing data and analytics - Your CRM and sales tools - Your social media and online research - Your referrals and introductions Once you have a list of qualified prospects, you can reach out to them via email, phone, or social media. The goal of your outreach is to get their attention and interest, and to book a meeting with them. To do that, you need to: - Personalize your message: use their name, company, industry, or any other relevant information - Provide value: offer something useful or helpful, such as a piece of content, a case study, or a free consultation - Ask for action: include a clear and specific call to action, such as a request for a meeting, a demo, or a trial Here's an example of an email that follows these guidelines: Subject: How to increase your sales conversion rate by 25% Hi John, I'm Mitch, the founder of Morando Method. I help B2B sales teams close more deals faster and easier. I came across your company on LinkedIn and I was impressed by your growth and success. I noticed that you are using Salesforce as your CRM platform. I have a question for you: are you happy with your sales conversion rate? If not, I have some good news for you. I have created a free guide that shows you how to increase your sales conversion rate by 25% using the Morando Method. The Morando Method is a simple and proven sales framework that helps you focus on what matters: what the customer is telling you. In this guide, you will learn: - How to qualify your prospects and target the right decision-makers - How to uncover your customer's pain points, goals, and needs - How to show your customer how your solution can solve their problems and deliver value - How to use one simple question to power the perfect close Would you like to get access to this guide? If yes, just reply to this email and I'll send it to you right away. If no, no worries. I don't want to bother you with something you don't need. Please let me know what you think. Best, Mitch ### Discover Once you have booked a meeting with a prospect, you need to conduct a discovery call. The goal of this call is to learn more about your prospect's situation, challenges, goals, and needs. To do that, you need to: - Set the agenda: explain the purpose and outcome of the call, and ask for their permission and time - Build rapport: use small talk, compliments, humor, or commonalities to break the ice and establish trust - Ask open-ended questions: use questions that start with who, what, where, when, why, and how to elicit detailed and meaningful answers - Listen actively: pay attention to what they say and how they say it, use verbal and non-verbal cues to show interest and understanding, and summarize or paraphrase what they say to confirm or clarify - Take notes: write down the key information they share with you, such as their pain points, goals, needs, budget, authority, timeline, etc. The most important part of the discovery call is asking open-ended questions. You want to avoid asking yes/no questions or leading questions that imply an answer or a solution. You want to ask questions that help you understand their situation from their perspective. Here are some examples of open-ended questions you can ask during the discovery call: - What are the main challenges or problems you are facing right now? - What are the consequences or implications of these challenges or problems? - What are your goals or desired outcomes for solving these challenges or problems? - What are the criteria or requirements for choosing a solution? - What are the alternatives or options you are considering or have tried before? - How do you measure or evaluate the success or failure of a solution? - Who are the people involved or affected by this decision? - How do you make or influence this decision? - When do you plan or need to make this decision? Asking open-ended questions will help you uncover valuable information that will help you tailor your solution and presentation to their specific needs and preferences. It will also help you build credibility and authority as a trusted advisor who can help them achieve their goals. ### Demo After you have conducted a discovery call with a prospect, you need to present your solution in a demo. The goal of this demo is to show them how your solution can solve their problems and deliver value. To do that, you need to: - Customize your demo: use the information you gathered during the discovery call to tailor your demo to their specific situation, challenges, goals, and needs - Focus on benefits: don't just list the features of your product; explain how each feature can help them achieve their desired outcomes - Use stories: use real-life examples or case studies of how your solution has helped other customers with similar problems or goals - Involve them: ask them to participate in the demo by asking questions, giving feedback, or trying out the product - Handle objections: anticipate and address any concerns or doubts they may have about your solution, such as price, quality, compatibility, etc. - Ask for feedback: at the end of the demo, ask them what they liked, disliked, or learned about your solution, and how it compares to their expectations or alternatives The most important part of the demo is focusing on benefits. You don't want to bore them with a long and technical presentation of your product features. You want to show them how your product can make their life easier, better, or more successful. Here are some examples of how to focus on benefits during the demo: - Don't say: "Our product has a cloud-based architecture that allows you to access it from any device and location." - Do say: "With our product, you can work from anywhere and anytime, without worrying about installation, maintenance, or security issues." - Don't say: "Our product has an AI-powered engine that analyzes your data and generates insights and recommendations." - Do say: "With our product, you can get actionable insights and suggestions that will help you optimize your performance and achieve your goals faster and easier." - Don't say: "Our product has a user-friendly interface that lets you customize and configure it according to your preferences and needs." - Do say: "With our product, you can enjoy a simple and intuitive experience that will make you feel comfortable and confident using it." Focusing on benefits will help you demonstrate the value and relevance of your solution to your prospect. It will also help you create a positive and emotional connection with them. ### Close After you have presented your solution in a demo, you need to ask for the sale and close the deal. The goal of this step is to move your prospect from interest to action, and from action to commitment. To do that, you need to: - Summarize the value: recap the main points of your presentation, highlighting the benefits and outcomes of your solution - Confirm the fit: ask them if they agree that your solution can solve their problems and meet their needs - Ask for the sale: use a direct or indirect closing question to ask them to buy your solution or take the next step - Handle objections: if they raise any objections or concerns, acknowledge them, empathize with them, and resolve them - Confirm the commitment: if they agree to buy your solution or take the next step, confirm the details and expectations of the deal The most important part of this step is asking for the sale. You don't want to leave the decision up to them or wait for them to make up their mind. You want to take control of the situation and guide them to a positive outcome. The Morando Method has one simple question that powers the perfect close. This question is: "What would you like to do next?" This question is simple but powerful because it: - Assumes that they are interested in your solution and ready to move forward - Gives them a sense of ownership and autonomy over their decision - Allows them to choose from a range of options that you can suggest or imply - Avoids putting pressure or creating resistance Here are some examples of how to use this question in different scenarios: - If they are ready to buy: "What would you like to do next? Would you like me to send you a contract or an invoice?" - If they need approval: "What would you like to do next? Would you like me to schedule a meeting with your boss or send you a proposal?" - If they need more information: "What would you like to do next? Would you like me to send you more details or a demo video?" - If they need more time: "What would you like to do next? Would you like me to follow up with you in a week or a month?" Using this question will help you close more deals faster and easier. It will also help you avoid awkward silences or rejections. ## How to overcome common sales challenges with the Morando Method The Morando Method is not a magic bullet that will solve all your sales problems. You will still face some common sales challenges that may prevent you from closing more deals. However, the Morando Method can help you overcome these challenges by using some simple strategies. Here are some common sales challenges and how to overcome them with the Morando Method: ### No response One of the most frustrating sales challenges is when your prospect doesn't respond to your outreach or follow-up messages. This can happen for various reasons, such as: - They are busy or distracted - They are not interested or qualified - They are not ready or motivated - They are waiting or comparing To overcome this challenge, you need to: - Be persistent: don't give up after one or two attempts; follow up with them until you get a response or a clear no - Be creative: use different channels, formats, and messages to catch their attention and interest - Be valuable: offer something useful or helpful, such as a piece of content, a case study, or a free consultation - Be respectful: don't spam them or annoy them; respect their time and preferences Here's an example of a follow-up email that follows these guidelines: Subject: Re: How to increase your sales conversion rate by 25% Hi John, I hope this email finds you well. I'm following up on my last email where I offered you a free guide on how to increase your sales conversion rate by 25% using the Morando Method. Did you get a chance to check it out? If yes, I'd love to hear your feedback and answer any questions you may have. If no, I understand. You must be busy with other priorities. But I don't want you to miss this opportunity to improve your sales performance and results. That's why I'm giving you one more chance to get access to this guide. All you have to do is reply to this email and I'll send it to you right away. But hurry, this offer expires in 24 hours. Please let me know what you think. Best, Mitch ### No trust Another common sales challenge is when your prospect doesn't trust you or your solution. This can happen for various reasons, such as: - They don't know you or your company - They have had bad experiences with other vendors or products - They have doubts or fears about your solution - They have objections or concerns about your solution To overcome this challenge, you need to: - Be credible: show your expertise and authority by sharing relevant and accurate information, data, and testimonials - Be transparent: be honest and upfront about your solution, its strengths and weaknesses, its costs and benefits, and its risks and guarantees - Be empathetic: show that you understand and care about their situation, challenges, goals, and needs - Be consistent: deliver on your promises and expectations, follow up on your commitments, and provide value at every touchpoint Here's an example of how to handle an objection with these guidelines: Prospect: "Your solution sounds good, but it's too expensive for us." You: "I understand. Price is an important factor in any decision. Can I ask you how much are you currently spending on solving this problem?" Prospect: "We are spending about $10,000 per month on our current solution." You: "I see. And how satisfied are you with the results of your current solution?" Prospect: "Not very. We are still struggling with low conversion rates and high churn rates." You: "That's unfortunate. Do you know how much money are you losing because of these issues?" Prospect: "We estimate that we are losing about $50,000 per month in potential revenue." You: "Wow. That's a lot of money. What if I told you that our solution can help you increase your conversion rate by 25% and reduce your churn rate by 15%?" Prospect: "That would be great. But how can you prove that?" You: "Well, we have data and testimonials from our customers who have achieved these results with our solution. Here's a case study of one of them. You can see how they were able to increase their revenue by $100,000 per month with our solution." Prospect: "That's impressive. But how much does your solution cost?" You: "Our solution costs $15,000 per month. But if you think about it, it's actually cheaper than your current solution. Let me show you why. If you use our solution, you can increase your revenue by $100,000 per month. That means you can get a return on investment of 567% in the first month. And that's not counting the savings from reducing your churn rate and increasing your customer loyalty. On the other hand, if you stick with your current solution, you will continue to lose $50,000 per month in potential revenue. That means you will lose $600,000 per year. So which option do you think is more expensive?" Prospect: "Well, when you put it that way..." You: "Exactly. So what would you like to do next?" ### No urgency Another common sales challenge is when your prospect doesn't have a sense of urgency or motivation to buy your solution. This can happen for various reasons, such as: - They don't have a clear problem or goal - They don't have a clear timeline or deadline - They don't have a clear budget or resources - They don't have a clear decision-making process this challenge, you need to: - Create pain: help them realize the severity and impact of their problem, and the cost and risk of inaction - Create gain: help them visualize the benefits and outcomes of your solution, and the value and reward of action - Create fear: help them understand the consequences and implications of choosing a wrong or inferior solution, and the opportunity and competitive loss of delay - Create hope: help them believe that your solution is the best and only option for them, and that you can help them achieve their goals faster and easier Here are some examples of how to create urgency with these guidelines: - Create pain: "How much time and money are you wasting on manual and inefficient processes?" - Create gain: "How much time and money could you save with automated and streamlined processes?" - Create fear: "How much time and money are you losing to your competitors who are using automated and streamlined processes?" - Create hope: "How much time and money can we help you save with our automated and streamlined processes?" Creating urgency will help you move your prospect from a passive or indifferent state to an active or excited state. It will also help you shorten your sales cycle and increase your conversion rate. ## How to get started with the Morando Method today The Morando Method is a simple and effective sales framework that can help you close more deals faster and easier. It's not


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